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Air lift cleaning a well


Cleaning a well with air The well was ran over by a truck, busting the casing 5′ below ground and the casing cap at ground level. They had another well in operation, so they just left the other one without fixing it for a year or two. Lowering the air pipe into the mud on bottom There was about 15′ of mud and debris in the bottom of the well. Getting a little cleaner, mostly dirt and fine sand from the formation now. We started getting some of the gravel pack out so we knew that was as deep as we could go. After a few times of cycling the air… All cleaned up and ready for a pump Pumping 20 gpm the well cleared up quickly. Air compressor is a blower on a hydrovac unit
about 300 cfm at 15 psi. Well is 26′ to static water,
34′ water level at 20 gpm
59′ deep.

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7 thoughts on “Air lift cleaning a well

  1. I also posted a video of a down hole camera before and after cleaning with air lifting. It can be found here: https://youtu.be/BdUKmEbkoeM

  2. Hey, Kenny! Thanks for the post! What was the cfm of your pump and how long did you run the unit before you removed enough sand and mud to pump clean, fresh water? Thanks for any response! Blessings!

  3. Does this work on deeper wells, like ~200ft? Can I repurpose my old 1" black poly tubing to pull up sand and silt, and maybe use a 6-7HP compressor? I'm thinking with a smaller line I wouldn't need as many CFM, it would just take longer.

  4. Is there a requirement for how many GPM the well should produce to do this? We measured 65' and our well has been in since the 50's. As far as I know, it's never been bailed or blown out. Can I just rent a gasoline powered compressor and drop the line in the well? I've used sulfamic acid and dry ice which helped, but I'm hoping any additional depth of well I can do will increase flow. We currently are at around 5 GPM while the all the neighbors get 10-20 gpm.

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